iPhone > Camera+ | Image Workflow 

Outcome:

By following this short tutorial on image workflow with the iPhone and the “Camera+” app to edit and manipulate images, the learner will practice creating stunning images with minimal investment in time and resources.

If you have purchased a smartphone in the last two or three years you have bought a camera with technology unthought of ten years ago.  These are pretty good cameras that can surf the internet and, function as a phone as well.

Take many pictures. Throw many in the trash. Practice, practice, practice.

Brief Overview

I will explain, with visual images and some text, my workflow as I choose an image and work through how I edit each image.

Be sure to study the screen captured images of my work within the Camera+ app (click on them and open). This shows many of the different things to choose from within the app. There are a lot of choices. Explore them.

Please, also realize that there are many other sub-menus to do many other things within this app.

Go. Do. Explore. And, don’t forget add your POSITIVE comments.


My Usual First Step

Be sure to click on, and open, the images below to see the larger rendition.

I preview what is in my “Photos” to choose what I want to work on.

I immediately cull the obvious junk. Look quickly; but look carefully. If you have an image of three people and two of them have their eyes closed, delete it. Unless of course; you planned for it to be that way.

Also review the image for story. What is your story? What are you trying to tell others with this image? How are you going to tell this story, and manipulate the image to that end.

Be sure to click on, and open, the images below to see the larger rendition.

Next I chose an image from my “Photos”

Consider this photo. What can I do with it?

Eh, I don’t like it. 😉 So I’ll move on to another.

Early Morning Float Pond

I like this image. I think it has potential, so I’ll send it from “Photos” to Camera+.

First step is to “pop” it a little using the “Clarity” button. I will often try all of these settings to find one that suits what I think the image should look like.

But I don’t like all of the gravel on the beach showing at the bottom of the screen.

Below, I have done a couple of things at the same time.

One: I’ve changed the “aspect ratio” from 4:3 (think old tube type TV’s) to the “Golden Ratio” of 16:9 (think modern TV).

Two: I cropped the image to what I consider to be a more pleasing composition, and to get rid of some of the gravel beach that didn’t support the story that was in my mind.

 

And here is the final product below. I added a “Frame”.

Oh and…I tried it in Black and White too. I check many images to see how they look as a Black and White shot. But who could pass up that wonderful sky color and reflection?

180 Cessna on the Juneau float pond 

The original Juneau float pond shot; as shot. This is “out of camera”. It’s a good one to start with but needs a little work. I took this from about 6′ off the dock surface so that the view is looking up at the aircraft, not straight on. It is a perspective that I encourage you to pursue. Something different than the normal line-of-sight.

I was displeased with the horizon on the original image. Awkward horizons are a pet peeve of mine, so I correct my mistake first (under “The Lab” and choose “Straighten”). Then I chose the “Clarity” toggle. Finally I added a “Frame”.

Coming home

My story with this image is all about Mt. Baker (located in the circle…drawn in “Photos” with iOS 11), and I wanted to work to make that the focus of my image story.

The process is similar here as well. “Clarity”. Fix the horizon (“The Lab” and “Straighten”). Finally I added a “Frame”.

It was fairly dark when I took this image. I think that it is pretty amazing to pull something like this off using the technology available. Is the image grainy? Of course. But I like the colors and composition, understanding that it was after sundown.

Drama Sky

I like clouds and how one might make them a focus of your image. This one is simple. Obviously the first step is to correct the horizon.

The second step was to turn it into a Black and White, and add a “Frame”.

Drama Sky 2

Pretty much the same workflow here, but I didn’t need to do anything with the horizon. Note the tree for visual reference.

To me this is an example of where Black and White can have quite an artistic impact on the image.

Here is a link to the best of the photos I took on this trip: https://flic.kr/s/aHskpg9QLE

In summary

I rarely spend more than 5 minutes editing an image with this workflow.

Take many pictures.

Throw many, many in the trash.

Practice, practice, practice. Repeat.

Thank you,

And, take more pictures!

The Fear of Mediocrity

The article linked below caught my eye last night. If you
throw “photography” and “educator” into the same title, it’s
likely to catch my attention.

The observation below, from within the article, caught my
eye and made me think of my own teaching practice. I have
always had a fear of mediocrity. The fear of hearing the
phrase, “Those that can do; those that can’t teach” has
driven my continuous improvement loop to avoid those words
being uttered in my presence, or said about me. Or worse
yet, to hear those words describe a program graduate.
Hearing the, “didn’t you teach them anything”, from that
crowd who claim that teaching is easy, was something I
always kept in the back of my mind to drive me from the dark
hole of mediocrity as well. Afterall, they give you the
books with all of the answers in the back what could it
take, eh? (-;

I have learned that learning is messy. And that it should
be. I’ve learned that telling is not teaching, that reading
all of the PowerPoint slides to a class is not an effective
tool for student learning. And I’ve learned that the real
learner wants to be engaged and included in a community of
learners…and the time spent to accommodate this is well
worth the investment. And I’ve learned that often the less I
talk the more they learn.

Over time I have also realized that there is so much more to
learning than just ticking off the boxes as the tasks are
completed. What did the learner really learn by doing the
task? Can they describe and reflect on their learning, and
what they actually learned? Can this be codified and tracked
by a mere multiple choice exam? Can they actually do the
work?

Remember that we are making an investment in people…the
learners who look to us to support their learning. I’d like
to hear comments on how you keep from accepting mediocrity.
What works for you?

Upon reflection I would say that my post title should state
“Accepting the Fear of Mediocrity”, but who would read that?
(-;

From: Is photography the best educator? I think so
and here’s why

“A lot of people are afraid to accept mediocrity because
they believe that if they accept it, they’ll never achieve
anything, never improve, and that their life won’t matter…
The rare people who do become truly exceptional at something
do so not because they believe they’re exceptional. On the
contrary, they become amazing because they’re obsessed with
improvement. And that obsession with improvement stems from
an unerring belief that they are, in fact, not that great at
all…because they understand that they’re not already
great…they are mediocre, they are average…and that they
could be so much better.”

Sourced here on 04/24/17: http://www.diypho…tm_source=feedburner [diyphotography.net]

These things are helpful for me to reflect on personally, as
I continue to work my way, away, from mediocrity.

Testing 

I’m testing the viability of the WordPress mobile app. 

Pictures are easy to add. 

iATN
Links are easy to add. 

This may be easier to work with than Blogger. 

I can move your blog assignment out another week if you want to try and create a WordPress mobile app blog. 

Let me know. 

Jeff 

Rybners/BTC Exchange 2015

The following is a continuing reflection on our exchange with EUC Vest that commenced in March, 2005 with my initial visit to Esbjerg, Denmark. Little did we know the consequences of these initial visits and the impact on our students and instructors at Bellingham Technical College (BTC) and EUC Vest.

In May of 2005 John Mortensen brought a group of students to the BTC welding rodeo. They promptly won first prize for their welding sculpture in a general competition involving college students in the Pacific Northwest. We were off to what now is a ten year history of exchanges! In the late fall, closing in on Christmas, we reciprocated and traveled to Denmark for our first exchange at EUC Vest (Now Rybners).

 

This year, 2015, the exchange started differently. In a money saving tactic we have been traveling between Bellingham and SEATAC on a shuttle bus service; we save a few hundred doing this. We allowed several hours over and above for travel but got caught up in a perfect storm of the a Seahawks game and a drenching rainstorm. As we were dropped off by the shuttle at the airport our plane was leaving. We were three hours later than our projected trip. Not the ideal beginning for an international exchange.

 

While traveling on the bus, and stuck in traffic at I-90 / I-405 interchange, I called Delta Airlines and was informed that the cost to change the tickets, because of missing our flight, would be $7500 each… Somewhat under my breath I stated that this exchange trip was over. At this point the lady asked some questions about who we were and what we were traveling for. She then put us in contact with Delta’s Salt Lake City international reservations group and we were able to fly on the next flight out on the next day. This was unbelievable customer service on the part of Delta Airlines.Red Horse Kyle

 

Life is a sum of our experiences. We were lucky to be traveling with such a great group of appreciative students that were able to roll with the experience of being late, problem solving and moving on. We traveled on as if nothing happened and had another experience of a lifetime for our students. We even had a little bit of fun.

 

All of our students in 2015 again participated in on-the-job experiences at the workplaces of their Danish student hosts and lived with them in their homes at various locations in the country for the first week in country.

Bold Tern Stand Up

The second week was different for the students this year. The Danish students hosted our students individually in their family homes. They shared meals together, in a family setting, and traveled back and forth to school each day together. They met their respective extended families and their friends and interacted on a highly personal level. Once again the students have all commented on what a rich experience this was and that they’ll never forget it. To a person they all want to encourage next year’s students to apply for the exchange because of the opportunities it has presented to them.

 

Group Photo VestasIn education we ask many questions about outcomes. “What did we learn?”, is a question often posed. The students learned about many things. One example is the controlled climbing and rigging that they recieved instruction on and experienced in a practicum. During this day they learned about working safe in wind turbine towers and what would be expected of them in an emergency situation. All of the students were required to problem solve and work as a team. They also had to work through any language and cultural differences to achieve positive results.

Wall Climb 2015

 

What were the educational outcomes achieved on this trip and how do we measure those outcomes? Only time and the actions of our students will tell. It is my hope that their individual reports and final presentation will capture a bit of that and that we can continue to participate in this exchange with Rybners.

 

This exchange only happens because of the forethought of Inger & Jens Bruun, and the continued support from the Scan|Design Foundation, that was created for the exchange of students from Washington State and Denmark. I often think of them looking down upon us in awe and wonder at what they created for our students. Who knows if they had an inkling of the impact that this exchange has had on our students? And who knows the future impact on our two societies through the actions of our students?

Jeff Curtis

Accessibility: Have You Planned? Do You Know?

Editable Accessibility Google Doc

The ADA: Questions and Answers

Hello Publisher Representatives!

Accommodation Request Form Link

Not otherwise qualified.

Cannot meet instructional outcomes without reasonable accommodations. (Accessibility department will determine)

Accessibility

 

The ADA: Questions and Answers

 

White Paper: Sections 508 and 504: Closed Captioning & Web Accessibility Requirements

 

White Paper: How the ADA Impacts Online Video Accessibility

 

Closed Captioning Requirements

 

Accommodation Request Form Link

 

BTC Faculty Handbook on Accessibility

 

Dr. Dzyban’s Sheet

 

BTC Accessibility Resources Page

 

Disability Resources: University of WA

 

Disability Resources: Columbia Basin Community College

 

In Our Shoes Video

Hello Publisher Representatives!

 

Before telling me about your textbook options, please know that I am committed to ensuring the accessibility of my course materials for all students, including those with disabilities, and I need you to be able to answer the following questions about your product:

 

Are you e-books compatible with screen-readers like JAWS?

 

If there is a study website or online component, is is fully accessible?

 

Are videos captioned and audio recordings transcribed?

 

Can all of the text that is displayed on the screen be read aloud by text-to-speech software?

 

Can all interactivity (media players, quizzes, flashcards, etc.) be completed by keyboard alone (no mouse required)?

 

Is there documentation available (VPAT or White Paper for example) that confirms accessibility or usability testing results?

 

Can students with dial-up internet quickly download the resources?

 

Do online images or test bank graphics come with alternative text descriptions?


Did you know? In accordance with the regulations of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), institutions of higher education are expected to adhere to accessibility standards and principles when designing, adopting and procuring educational materials and resources for the delivery of course curricula. This includes, but is not limited to, the following: E-books, coursepacks, e-learning platforms, interactive and instructive on-line learning management systems, audio-visual and multi-media.

 

 

Rybners (formerly EUC Vest)/BTC Exchange 2014

Rybners/BTC Exchange 2014

The following is a continuing reflection on our exchange with EUC Vest that commenced in March, 2005 with my initial visit to Esbjerg, Denmark. Little did we know the consequences of these initial visits and the impact on our students and instructors at Bellingham Technical College (BTC) and EUC Vest.

In May of 2005 John Mortensen brought a group of students to the BTC welding rodeo and promptly won first prize for their welding sculpture in a general competition involving college students in the Pacific Northwest. We were off! In the late fall, closing in on Christmas, we reciprocated and traveled to Denmark for a memorable exchange at EUC Vest.


This year, 2014, started and ended as these things do. But in between were experiences of a lifetime for our students. All of our students in 2014 again participated in on-the-job experiences at the work places of their Danish student hosts and lived with them in their homes at various locations in the country for the first week in country.

Exchange team 2014 Diesel House Exchange team 2014 Diesel House with Tech

The second week was a bit different for the students this year. The Danish students rented a summer home about 30 minutes from the college and all eight of them stayed there for the week. They prepared meals together, watched movies and traveled back and forth to school each day together. Once again they have all commented on what a rich experience this was and that they’ll never forget it. To a person they all want to encourage next years students to apply for the exchange because of the opportunities it has presented to them.

In education we ask many questions about outcomes. “What did we learn”, is a question often posed. In the following photo we were fortunate to have the most senior engineer, Jens Grauballe Erikse, from DFDS Seaways deliver instruction to the students on a variety of systems on the ship that was on the run from Harwich, England. This run was affectionately know as the “bacon run” because of the amount of bacon shipped to England. Pictured below, Jens took the time with our students for valuable one-on-one instruction on complex control and maintenance systems. I first met Jens on my 2005 trip to Denmark and because of this relationship he knew that our students were serious learners that he may have an impact on.

Jens Bridge 2014

Educational outcomes achieved on this trip and how do we measure those outcomes? Only time and the actions of our students will tell. It is my hope that their individual reports and final presentation on 30 October will capture a bit of that. Surely it is no less than previous exchanges, and, in my opinion, even better than the previous ones. In the end however, all were spent.

Train Ride Back 2014


This exchange only happens because of the forethought of Inger & Jens Bruun and the Scan|Design Foundation, that they created for the exchange of students from Washington State and Denmark. I often think of them looking down upon us in awe and wonder at what they created for our students. Who knows if they had an inkling of the impact that this exchange has had on our students? And who knows the future impact on our two societies through the actions of our students?

Jeff Curtis

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1vFoSdzKzbJKu1o2T9-nKwBe-H-jqA0Ry9tKbRSuuVyk/edit?usp=sharing_eid

Edit

LEAVE A REPLY

Logged in as admin. Log out?

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Read More